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Why do they issue tickets for running stop signs/traffic lights in empty intersections if the 'intention' of the law is to prevent collision?

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  • Why do they issue tickets for running stop signs/traffic lights in empty intersections if the 'intention' of the law is to prevent collision?


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Answer #1 | 23/07 2014 12:09
Intersections will at times not be empty, on those occasions it is imperative that at least one vehicle/person stop, thus the law.
Positive: 100 %
Answer #2 | 23/07 2014 12:42
Because you are not perfect, and sooner or later that "empty" intersection will suddenly have another vehicle in it when you weren't expecting one. Many people have died while running a red light or a stop sign, or were killed when someone else did. Probably the driver thought the intersection was empty, so they didn't stop. Another life snuffed out. And yes, I am speaking from experience. Except in my case, it was a railroad crossing with no crossing arms (just a crossbuck), so I thought there was "never" a train on those tracks. Then one day I drove across those tracks without stopping, then in my rear view mirror I noticed a train was passing behind me.
Answer #3 | 23/07 2014 11:58
That's one of those things in life you just have to let go of.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #4 | 23/07 2014 12:07
Because people can't predict the future.
Answer #5 | 23/07 2014 12:29
It gives cops a thrill to exert their authority. You are really lucky all you got was a ticket.
Answer #6 | 23/07 2014 12:33
revenue
Answer #7 | 23/07 2014 14:25
A red light is a red light and the law says to stop for red lights. The law doesn't say you must stop for a red light if failing to do so will result in a collision. A law that context sensitive would be impossibly expensive to implement and enforce.
Answer #8 | 23/07 2014 12:00
The intention of law is to enforce the laws. Stop means stop. If you look at laws closely you will find a lot of them that don't seem to make any sense. The worst limit the reasonable because of the unreasonable.
Answer #9 | 23/07 2014 12:07
Because we live in a society that doesn't understand personal responsibility. They want blanket, one-size fits-all laws that don't consider the situation or the circumstance.

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