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What types if materials can be reliably radiometrically dated?

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  • What types if materials can be reliably radiometrically dated?


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Answer #1 | 28/09 2015 09:45
It depends on the detection system. C14 dating works on organic deposits within a fairly short time range. Crystal decay track works on anything that was molten and formed good crystals (that shows tracks) on cooling. Thermoluminescence applies.
Positive: 71.428571428571 %
Answer #2 | 29/09 2015 08:15
all materials which contain radioactive isotopes and act as closed systems throughout their period of existence (no loss or gain in parent or daughter isotopes following formation of the substance) can be dated to time of formation using radiometric means. Whether the date of formation of the examined object will be the same as the date of formation of the enclosing material (the rock or sediment) is a separate issue. that is, the date of a grain of rutile in a sediment will be the date of formation of the rutile but typically not of the sediment. these dates can be quite different. the age of wood used in an axe could be quite different from the age of the soil where the axe was found (although wood tends to not last long enough for that difference to be important). There are also technological limitations on what age ranges can be defined by measurement of isotope contents. We cannot define very small changes or quantities using the available technologies, so as a practical matter, each isotope system has an ideal age range where it can be used. the signal to noise ratio is too high except within a specific window of concentrations.
Positive: 60 %
Answer #3 | 28/09 2015 09:19
In general there are two criteria: 1) the material must result from a process that either isolates a radionuclide from its source of production, or creates disequilibrium in a radioactive decay chain, or separates a radioactive parent nuclide from its decay product. 2) the material must be capable of keeping the radiometric chronometer isolated for time periods longer than the timescales recorded by the radiometric chronometer. In simple terms, the material should not leak. The exact requirements and type of material suitable depend on the method used (of which there are many). There is no single answer.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #4 | 28/09 2015 02:19
In general there are two criteria: 1) the material must result from a process that either isolates a radionuclide from its source of production, or creates disequilibrium in a radioactive decay chain, or separates a radioactive parent nuclide from its decay product. 2) the material must be capable of keeping the radiometric chronometer isolated for time periods longer than the timescales recorded by the radiometric chronometer. In simple terms, the material should not leak. The exact requirements and type of material suitable depend on the method used (of which there are many). There is no single answer.
Positive: 45.454545454545 %
Answer #5 | 28/09 2015 16:45
It depends on the detection system. C14 dating works on organic deposits within a fairly short time range. Crystal decay track works on anything that was molten and formed good crystals (that shows tracks) on cooling. Thermoluminescence applies.
Positive: 41.666666666667 %
Answer #6 | 27/09 2015 22:43
Stuff once alive.
Positive: 37.5 %
Answer #7 | 28/09 2015 05:43
Stuff once alive.
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #8 | 29/09 2015 15:15
all materials which contain radioactive isotopes and act as closed systems throughout their period of existence (no loss or gain in parent or daughter isotopes following formation of the substance) can be dated to time of formation using radiometric means. Whether the date of formation of the examined object will be the same as the date of formation of the enclosing material (the rock or sediment) is a separate issue. that is, the date of a grain of rutile in a sediment will be the date of formation of the rutile but typically not of the sediment. these dates can be quite different. the age of wood used in an axe could be quite different from the age of the soil where the axe was found (although wood tends to not last long enough for that difference to be important). There are also technological limitations on what age ranges can be defined by measurement of isotope contents. We cannot define very small changes or quantities using the available technologies, so as a practical matter, each isotope system has an ideal age range where it can be used. the signal to noise ratio is too high except within a specific window of concentrations.
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
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