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My daughter wishes to leave her rented room early, I have found her deposit has not been placed with a governm?

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  • My daughter wishes to leave her rented room early, I have found her deposit has not been placed with a governm?


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Answer #1 | 02/01 2014 12:15
No, I'm afraid you aren't right. That alone won't invalidate her tenancy (and if he is a resident landlord, he doesn't have to do that anyway).
Answer #2 | 02/01 2014 12:41
Jan49 has explained it exactly right.
Answer #3 | 02/01 2014 12:35
No If she wants to come out of her lease early, then she pays the rent up until the end of the lease then gets back her deposit ,minus any deductions for any damages UK
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Answer #4 | 02/01 2014 12:19
If she is renting a room as a lodger there is nothing to say any deposit should be protected.
Answer #5 | 02/01 2014 13:11
No...your daughter has a lease (by the sounds of it) for a fixed term. This is a legally binding contract between her and the landlord and she must fulfill her legal obligation. If the landlord broke the law then report him but that does not then allow your daughter to break a different law.
Answer #6 | 02/01 2014 13:47
2 entirely separate and different issues. Your daughter's lease stands - and unless its got an exit clause, she's legally bound to pay for the duration of the lease.
Answer #7 | 05/01 2014 17:46
She can leave, but could be held liable for lost rent for the duration of the contract If she leaves and the landlord has not protected the deposit in a scheme then she will probably get 3 x her deposit back as a penalty PLUS the original deposit as well. http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_advice/tenancy_deposits/tenancy_deposit_protection_schemes I would suggest NOT to mention the deposit protection to the landlord. It also depends how much time she has to go before she completes the minimum term.
Answer #8 | 03/01 2014 06:35
No, this is a different matter...there is more than one government scheme, your daughter cant use this as a reason to get out of her lease. She needs to give notice and pay all she owes.
Answer #9 | 02/01 2014 17:05
I wouldn't think one has anything to do with the other.

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