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Is the “problem of evil” (theodicy) the initial issue when considering the existence of god(s) or not?

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  • Is the “problem of evil” (theodicy) the initial issue when considering the existence of god(s) or not?


Answers

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Positive: 100 %
Answer #2 | 28/01 2016 17:31
No. The complete lack of verifiable evidence is much more telling.
Positive: 100 %
Answer #3 | 28/01 2016 09:31
No. The complete lack of verifiable evidence is much more telling.
Positive: 66.666666666667 %
Answer #4 | 28/01 2016 09:51
No. That's just the issue if you discuss the GOOD God fantasy, not the god fantasy as a whole.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #5 | 28/01 2016 17:34
I always believed in the triune God, but for my part the struggle was whether I wanted and was able to do as He wants us all to do. I finally encountered a series called Table Talk. you can buy it at LightBearers.org. Season 1 changed my life in that I finally liked talking and praying to God.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #6 | 28/01 2016 17:56
It is for some people, and for quite a few anti-theists on this site who keep raising Epicurus's famous claim: "Is God willing to prevent evil but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?" But this constitutes a non-sequitur. A – Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. That is not a sufficient basis for identifying God (or anyone else) as malevolent. B – Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? That’s a different sort of non-sequitur. There is no obvious relationship between the first question and the second. That is: assuming that evil has an origin, there is no reason to believe that origin is different for each of these cases. The answer is simple: God is both able and willing, but that has no relevance regarding the origin or the continuation of evil. God has, on occasions, demonstrated His ability to stamp on persistent evil but has always waited a long time first, to allow people to repent and to be spared His wrath. But guess what – people who hate God then accuse Him of being unjust in stamping out persistent evil! It is God’s will that all evil will, eventually, be removed from the cosmos, but in His way, at His time, to settle issues of good and evil once and for all. He triumphed over evil on the cross, but those who walk in darkness cannot see that. The battle has actually already been won. Satan is a dead demon walking. Not that people who hate God will listen to that. Theodicy is but one weapon in the armoury of anti-theists. If it fails to find its mark, they pull out another one and try that.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #7 | 28/01 2016 17:44
No. The problem of evil is not done to refute the EXISTENCE of God. But rather the NATURE of God. The problem of evil comes later. There is only a problem of evil if you first accept 1- God exists, 2- There is only one God, and 3- That one God is omnibenevolent. For example, for atheists, (most) polytheists, and Muslims there is NO problem of evil at all. This is because the problem of evil asks: "Why is there evil in a universe created by a single God that is all-good?" So, if you don't accept there's a god (atheists) there's no problem. Or, if you accept there are multiple gods, some of whom are evil and/or opposing each other (polytheists), there's no problem. Or, if you accept that evil becomes good when done by God (Muslims), there's no problem. The problem of evil is almost uniquely a Christian problem. (It comes from trying to mix Jewish mysticism with Platonism.)
Positive: 50 %
Answer #8 | 28/01 2016 17:33
No. The problem of evil is evidence that there's a God. In order to have a problem with evil, you need to first have some idea of something different than the evil in question. Such an idea has no foundation in a Godless universe.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #9 | 28/01 2016 17:51
No. It is only a monotheistic problem. A god of evil is the trivial resolution.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #10 | 28/01 2016 20:55
No The search for a methodology for discovering that truth should be the first consideration.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #11 | 28/01 2016 17:54
The belief in evil makes you infer that God created it. It doesn't exist.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #12 | 28/01 2016 17:35
No. You can make up good gods and bad gods. You can make up any kind and any number of gods. Christianity solved that by having two gods, one for the things they like and one for the things they don't like. They call the second god satan and insist that it is not an actual god, but. There are so many different problems with the existence of gods that I don't see how any of them might be considered 'initial'.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #13 | 28/01 2016 17:59
No, the problem of evil is really not a consideration if you think god is either indifferent or not entirely good. Only when you claim that god is all good, then the existence of evil in the world, presumably, his creation, becomes problematic.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #14 | 28/01 2016 17:34
I rarely use the 'problem of evil' when considering the existence of 'god(s)'. Inferring the existence of an infinitely more complex creator (who didn't require a creator) in order to explain the existence and complexity of the universe is already redundant.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #15 | 28/01 2016 17:49
The Problem Of Evil disproves a god that is omnipotent, omniscient, and perfectly benevolent. It says nothing about a god that lacks one or more of those properties.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #16 | 28/01 2016 09:59
No, the problem of evil is really not a consideration if you think god is either indifferent or not entirely good. Only when you claim that god is all good, then the existence of evil in the world, presumably, his creation, becomes problematic.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #17 | 28/01 2016 17:36
You think that gods are good, just because they say they are?
Positive: 50 %
Answer #18 | 28/01 2016 09:44
No. The problem of evil is not done to refute the EXISTENCE of God. But rather the NATURE of God. The problem of evil comes later. There is only a problem of evil if you first accept 1- God exists, 2- There is only one God, and 3- That one God is omnibenevolent. For example, for atheists, (most) polytheists, and Muslims there is NO problem of evil at all. This is because the problem of evil asks: "Why is there evil in a universe created by a single God that is all-good?" So, if you don't accept there's a god (atheists) there's no problem. Or, if you accept there are multiple gods, some of whom are evil and/or opposing each other (polytheists), there's no problem. Or, if you accept that evil becomes good when done by God (Muslims), there's no problem. The problem of evil is almost uniquely a Christian problem. (It comes from trying to mix Jewish mysticism with Platonism.)
Positive: 50 %
Answer #19 | 28/01 2016 09:51
No. It is only a monotheistic problem. A god of evil is the trivial resolution.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #20 | 28/01 2016 09:34
I always believed in the triune God, but for my part the struggle was whether I wanted and was able to do as He wants us all to do. I finally encountered a series called Table Talk. you can buy it at LightBearers.org. Season 1 changed my life in that I finally liked talking and praying to God.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #21 | 28/01 2016 10:49
That's part of it.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #22 | 28/01 2016 09:35
Rather, the problem of why 'good' exists should be considered. If there is no God, why is there any good at all? Everyone would be living the most selfish life possible - without regard for consequences.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #23 | 28/01 2016 09:35
No. You can make up good gods and bad gods. You can make up any kind and any number of gods. Christianity solved that by having two gods, one for the things they like and one for the things they don't like. They call the second god satan and insist that it is not an actual god, but. There are so many different problems with the existence of gods that I don't see how any of them might be considered 'initial'.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #24 | 28/01 2016 12:55
No The search for a methodology for discovering that truth should be the first consideration.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #25 | 28/01 2016 09:36
You think that gods are good, just because they say they are?
Positive: 50 %
Answer #26 | 28/01 2016 09:34
I rarely use the 'problem of evil' when considering the existence of 'god(s)'. Inferring the existence of an infinitely more complex creator (who didn't require a creator) in order to explain the existence and complexity of the universe is already redundant.
Positive: 50 %
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Answer #28 | 28/01 2016 09:33
No. The problem of evil is evidence that there's a God. In order to have a problem with evil, you need to first have some idea of something different than the evil in question. Such an idea has no foundation in a Godless universe.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #29 | 28/01 2016 09:56
It is for some people, and for quite a few anti-theists on this site who keep raising Epicurus's famous claim: "Is God willing to prevent evil but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?" But this constitutes a non-sequitur. A – Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. That is not a sufficient basis for identifying God (or anyone else) as malevolent. B – Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? That’s a different sort of non-sequitur. There is no obvious relationship between the first question and the second. That is: assuming that evil has an origin, there is no reason to believe that origin is different for each of these cases. The answer is simple: God is both able and willing, but that has no relevance regarding the origin or the continuation of evil. God has, on occasions, demonstrated His ability to stamp on persistent evil but has always waited a long time first, to allow people to repent and to be spared His wrath. But guess what – people who hate God then accuse Him of being unjust in stamping out persistent evil! It is God’s will that all evil will, eventually, be removed from the cosmos, but in His way, at His time, to settle issues of good and evil once and for all. He triumphed over evil on the cross, but those who walk in darkness cannot see that. The battle has actually already been won. Satan is a dead demon walking. Not that people who hate God will listen to that. Theodicy is but one weapon in the armoury of anti-theists. If it fails to find its mark, they pull out another one and try that.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #30 | 28/01 2016 17:51
No. That's just the issue if you discuss the GOOD God fantasy, not the god fantasy as a whole.
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #31 | 28/01 2016 09:54
The belief in evil makes you infer that God created it. It doesn't exist.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #32 | 28/01 2016 17:38
No, the initial issue is to consider whether there is evidence for gods. Once you can reasonably assume gods exist, then you can start worrying about why there is evil in the world etc, etc. Btw there is no evidence. Which is why the first issue is finding it. Good luck.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #33 | 28/01 2016 09:49
The Problem Of Evil disproves a god that is omnipotent, omniscient, and perfectly benevolent. It says nothing about a god that lacks one or more of those properties.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #34 | 28/01 2016 09:38
No, the initial issue is to consider whether there is evidence for gods. Once you can reasonably assume gods exist, then you can start worrying about why there is evil in the world etc, etc. Btw there is no evidence. Which is why the first issue is finding it. Good luck.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #35 | 28/01 2016 17:35
Rather, the problem of why 'good' exists should be considered. If there is no God, why is there any good at all? Everyone would be living the most selfish life possible - without regard for consequences.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #36 | 28/01 2016 18:49
That's part of it.
Positive: 0 %

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