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I want to unblock google hangouts plugin?

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  • I want to unblock google hangouts plugin?


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Answer #1 | 24/01 2016 06:51
I don't use them, certainly not for transporting data. That ribbon cable is never connected.
Positive: 100 %
Answer #2 | 23/01 2016 16:13
very old technology
Positive: 100 %
Answer #3 | 23/01 2016 18:17
EXTREMELY FEW people use floppies. And no computer today supports one.
Positive: 100 %
Answer #4 | 25/01 2016 15:08
Not necessarily old technology. On the service side, I still use them, usually to install drivers that the OS does not pick up during reinstalls.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #5 | 23/01 2016 08:17
"Do people still use floppy disk as of 2016" " my grandmother still uses them every day" Then answer is obviously yes people still do use them.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #6 | 24/01 2016 01:52
I have some 3.5" floppy drives in a couple of old Macs in my home LAN. On occasion I'll run across something that is still on an old floppy and need to use it. IE: My first technical book that was published was written on a Mac Plus and stored on Floppy. Found it a few weeks ago and wanted to update the book. Had to use an old Mac 8600 tower to copy the files and then transferred it via ethernet in the LAN to a newer G5 Mac tower that could handle that old file type. Translated it on the G5 into something the newest OS could read and used Wi-Fi to transfer it to my Mac Pro tower, where I do all my writing these days. That was switching between OS 8.1, OS 10.4 (running OS 9 in "Classic" mode) and OS 10.10. For the Windows side, think Windows 3.0 to Windows XP to Windows 10 without missing a beat. Other than that, those Macs run tasks that their older software and slower speeds can handle, freeing the newer equipment to handle the more time sensitive processing that needs faster and much more powerful computers. I haven't had a computer that could run the old 5.25" floppies since before my Mac Plus. I had a "Laser 128EX", which was an Apple IIc clone that had the (at the time) huge option of having 1 meg of RAM. (8-128k IC's!) The other computers of the era were limited to 128k, or (just coming out), 256k of RAM. Of course back then, there was no Windows, or Mac OS. it was all DOS. (MS DOS for the IBM machines and DOS 3.3 for Apple.) Everything was done via floppies as there were no hard drives available. First hard drive I owned was the one that I had for my Plus. 20 MB, which was the largest available at that time. It was external, as the Plus had only a floppy drive as an internal device. it also was huge. The Plus sat on top of it like a pedestal.That was one of Steve Jobs goofs that he laughed about later. At that time, Apple didn't offer anything larger than the 20 MB hard drive because Steve couldn't see how anyone would need more storage space! Times have changed!
Positive: 50 %
Answer #7 | 27/01 2016 03:55
Computers may still have a floppy disk drive, and very old ones will use the larger disk sizes. It may be possible to get a peripheral floppy disk drive that you can connect to the computer if doesn't have a drive already installed.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #8 | 23/01 2016 10:17
EXTREMELY FEW people use floppies. And no computer today supports one.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #9 | 23/01 2016 11:50
Modern day computers don't come with floppy disk drives anymore and so as technology moved forward so did the user base. The only people who use them are people who have very outdated computers. So the answer is: yes people with old computers that have floppy disk drives do use them.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #10 | 23/01 2016 17:52
I have some 3.5" floppy drives in a couple of old Macs in my home LAN. On occasion I'll run across something that is still on an old floppy and need to use it. IE: My first technical book that was published was written on a Mac Plus and stored on Floppy. Found it a few weeks ago and wanted to update the book. Had to use an old Mac 8600 tower to copy the files and then transferred it via ethernet in the LAN to a newer G5 Mac tower that could handle that old file type. Translated it on the G5 into something the newest OS could read and used Wi-Fi to transfer it to my Mac Pro tower, where I do all my writing these days. That was switching between OS 8.1, OS 10.4 (running OS 9 in "Classic" mode) and OS 10.10. For the Windows side, think Windows 3.0 to Windows XP to Windows 10 without missing a beat. Other than that, those Macs run tasks that their older software and slower speeds can handle, freeing the newer equipment to handle the more time sensitive processing that needs faster and much more powerful computers. I haven't had a computer that could run the old 5.25" floppies since before my Mac Plus. I had a "Laser 128EX", which was an Apple IIc clone that had the (at the time) huge option of having 1 meg of RAM. (8-128k IC's!) The other computers of the era were limited to 128k, or (just coming out), 256k of RAM. Of course back then, there was no Windows, or Mac OS. it was all DOS. (MS DOS for the IBM machines and DOS 3.3 for Apple.) Everything was done via floppies as there were no hard drives available. First hard drive I owned was the one that I had for my Plus. 20 MB, which was the largest available at that time. It was external, as the Plus had only a floppy drive as an internal device. it also was huge. The Plus sat on top of it like a pedestal.That was one of Steve Jobs goofs that he laughed about later. At that time, Apple didn't offer anything larger than the 20 MB hard drive because Steve couldn't see how anyone would need more storage space! Times have changed!
Positive: 50 %
Answer #11 | 23/01 2016 12:54
Laser idsk
Positive: 50 %
Answer #12 | 23/01 2016 22:51
I don't use them, certainly not for transporting data. That ribbon cable is never connected.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #13 | 23/01 2016 08:13
very old technology
Positive: 50 %
Answer #14 | 23/01 2016 08:17
It's a case of what you feel comfortable with. If your grandmother's computing needs can be satisfied with floppy disks and a computer that's old enough to use them, she doesn't really need to learn to use anything else. Around 5 years ago, I bulk erased all my floppy disks (around 2,000 of them) and gave them to an artist to make into a sculpture. I have a USB pen drive that will contain the same amount of data.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #15 | 23/01 2016 16:17
It's a case of what you feel comfortable with. If your grandmother's computing needs can be satisfied with floppy disks and a computer that's old enough to use them, she doesn't really need to learn to use anything else. Around 5 years ago, I bulk erased all my floppy disks (around 2,000 of them) and gave them to an artist to make into a sculpture. I have a USB pen drive that will contain the same amount of data.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #16 | 23/01 2016 19:50
Modern day computers don't come with floppy disk drives anymore and so as technology moved forward so did the user base. The only people who use them are people who have very outdated computers. So the answer is: yes people with old computers that have floppy disk drives do use them.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #17 | 23/01 2016 20:54
Laser idsk
Answer #18 | 23/01 2016 16:17
"Do people still use floppy disk as of 2016" " my grandmother still uses them every day" Then answer is obviously yes people still do use them.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #19 | 25/01 2016 07:08
Not necessarily old technology. On the service side, I still use them, usually to install drivers that the OS does not pick up during reinstalls.
Positive: 0 %
Answer #20 | 26/01 2016 19:55
Computers may still have a floppy disk drive, and very old ones will use the larger disk sizes. It may be possible to get a peripheral floppy disk drive that you can connect to the computer if doesn't have a drive already installed.
Positive: 0 %

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