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Carbon-14 is particularly useful for radioactive dating. True Or False?

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  • Carbon-14 is particularly useful for radioactive dating. True Or False?


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Answer #1 | 10/07 2016 22:15
It depends on the age of what you are trying to date, and it depends on whether or not what you are trying to date is organic. Radiocarbon dating is useful for organic material, less than about 50,000 years old. Any older than that, and there isn't enough C14 left in the sample to get a meaningful date. Any C14 you might detect would be likely from contamination, or sampling error. It's also useless for inorganic material, so using it to date diamond, which are made from inorganic carbon, or dinosaur bones (which are not only too old, but the organic material has been replaced by inorganic minerals) will give false dates.
Answer #2 | 11/07 2016 04:35
The sensitivity of equipment is improving but even so the detectable limit means 14C dating is only useful for things up to ~60,000 years old. It is also only useful for once living things that contain organic carbon. While it is not useful for fully mineralised fossils some dinosaur fossils still contain organic material and have been dated using 14C, This has now been done on multiple fossils by multiple researchers with strict controls to prevent contamination.
Answer #3 | 10/07 2016 23:21
It is useful for dating recent events, but useless for really old ones because it has a relatively short half-life. .
Answer #4 | 11/07 2016 08:41
That would be true for specimens of paleolithic nature such as fossils.
Answer #5 | 10/07 2016 21:50
True
Answer #6 | 10/07 2016 21:49
True. Most specifically it's particularly useful for radioactive dating of things that used to be alive.
Answer #7 | 10/07 2016 15:15
It depends on the age of what you are trying to date, and it depends on whether or not what you are trying to date is organic. Radiocarbon dating is useful for organic material, less than about 50,000 years old. Any older than that, and there isn't enough C14 left in the sample to get a meaningful date. Any C14 you might detect would be likely from contamination, or sampling error. It's also useless for inorganic material, so using it to date diamond, which are made from inorganic carbon, or dinosaur bones (which are not only too old, but the organic material has been replaced by inorganic minerals) will give false dates.
Answer #8 | 10/07 2016 14:49
True. Most specifically it's particularly useful for radioactive dating of things that used to be alive.
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Answer #11 | 10/07 2016 21:35
The sensitivity of equipment is improving but even so the detectable limit means 14C dating is only useful for things up to ~60,000 years old. It is also only useful for once living things that contain organic carbon. While it is not useful for fully mineralised fossils some dinosaur fossils still contain organic material and have been dated using 14C, This has now been done on multiple fossils by multiple researchers with strict controls to prevent contamination.
Answer #12 | 10/07 2016 14:50
True
Answer #13 | 11/07 2016 01:41
That would be true for specimens of paleolithic nature such as fossils.
Answer #14 | 10/07 2016 16:21
It is useful for dating recent events, but useless for really old ones because it has a relatively short half-life. .

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