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Can i cut a concrete slab with a skill saw?

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  • Can i cut a concrete slab with a skill saw?


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Answer #1 | 11/09 2015 21:45
If you buy a 7 1/4" masonry blade and have someone spray the blade with a good amount of water while you work, assuming you have a powerful enough saw, it will work. (you would only be able to cut 3 1/2" deep)
Positive: 60 %
Answer #2 | 08/09 2015 13:38
Yes, but as others say, with a special blade, might kill the saw, will be a pain in the ***, but it is doable
Positive: 50 %
Answer #3 | 10/09 2015 06:43
Yes
Positive: 50 %
Answer #4 | 09/09 2015 14:52
You can try but the tool rental is the way to go ......
Positive: 50 %
Answer #5 | 10/09 2015 07:07
NO
Positive: 50 %
Answer #6 | 08/09 2015 03:08
I would highly advise against it. But the saw is not the problem. You would need a particular blade for it. They are typically called diamond blades but if you went to your nearest tool rental shop you could buy one. Considering that the size of the blade wont fit in your skill saw it would be best to just rent one.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #7 | 08/09 2015 19:02
With the right blade, maybe. But you'd probably burn out the motor in a consumer-grade skillsaw. This is a good reason for a trip to your local tool rental shop. Get a respirator, hearing protection, and a good visor, while you're there.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #8 | 08/09 2015 18:19
Yes you can. Use a masonry blade and go slow. It might take several blades.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #9 | 12/09 2015 08:37
You would need a masonry blade to make a decent cut.
Positive: 50 %
Answer #10 | 09/09 2015 15:07
Yes it's possible to dry-cut concrete with a homeowners Skil saw. Here's how. Get six diamond masonry blades, put one in the saw and set it for the deepest cut. Leave the saw running & in the groove but only use light forward pressure for 10-12 seconds, then let it run with no forward pressure for 5-7 seconds, to cool the motor down. Take your time, put no more forward pressure than sliding a beer mug across the table. The diamond coating on those blades is about 3/8", so when the blade is used up, the cut depth is only 3/8" less. And of course, safety glasses, ear buds & a face dust mask. Return the unused blades.
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #11 | 08/09 2015 12:36
You shouldn't try this, you may harm yourself.
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #12 | 08/09 2015 03:21
You have to put a masonry blade in it, and cut it dry, no lube. If it's thick, you should cut it in several shallow passes, you may want to rent a concrete cutter from a tool rental shop.
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #13 | 09/09 2015 18:08
I wouldn't try
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #14 | 08/09 2015 04:50
What size slab? What TYPE of Skill BRAND saw? The sort answer is yes, but it is also useless.
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #15 | 09/09 2015 08:45
You must not try this.It may harm yourself.
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #16 | 08/09 2015 09:31
Yes, it can be done. I've done it - when putting in a new gas line to the pool. I cut maybe 30" of 2 or 3 inch thick concrete walkway with a really crappy 7½" blade skill saw - that I bought at a garage sale for $5. You have to make sure there is water running over it as you cut, AND you have to make sure you don't get wet or get water in the saw. I kneeled on a board on some other boards about 2" above the ground, and just dribbled enough water from a hose turned way down to keep the blade wet and lubed and the cut debris away from the cut. I also used an extension cord with a ground fault circuit interrupter built in. You'll have to make several passes, each only ¼ to ½ inch deep. Also, it wears the blade away as you cut. A 7½ blade gets down to 6½" very quickly. Personally, I think it's a stupid thing to do. If you get at all wet, an electric shock can be deadly. You can do it dry, but it raises a lot of dust and you need a special blade. See http://www.familyhandyman.com/masonry/how-to-cut-concrete/view-all
Positive: 33.333333333333 %
Answer #17 | 08/09 2015 03:36
With the right blade, maybe. But you'd probably burn out the motor in a consumer-grade skillsaw. This is a good reason for a trip to your local tool rental shop. Get a respirator, hearing protection, and a good visor, while you're there.
Positive: 25 %

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