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What is the point of finding new planets when we cant reach them?

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  • What is the point of finding new planets when we cant reach them?


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Answer #1 | 07/01 2015 21:51
The pursuit of knowledge is it's own "point". Of course the same thing could have been asked of Christopher Columbus.... And many idiots of the time did.
Positive: 42 %
Answer #2 | 07/01 2015 21:35
the same reason i like to read about new luxury cars, even though they are financially out of reach.
Positive: 36 %
Answer #3 | 07/01 2015 21:51
Mankind has a vast curiosity for discovering new things. Even when they are of no possible use. The funny thing is that they often turn out to be useful at some later time.
Positive: 16 %
Answer #4 | 07/01 2015 22:15
What was the purpose of inventing the wheel before we had sports cars?
Positive: 10 %
Answer #5 | 07/01 2015 22:02
It's the same reason that compelled you to ask that question - curiosity.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #6 | 08/01 2015 00:25
Our curiosity. It is what drives our scientific minds on. We are getting better and better at detection techniques and are able to calculate their density and mass from their orbits. We are not far from detecting their chemistry. Even though they may be impossible to get to with our present technology, we are mere beginners in cosmological history. We may never know, but it sure not for the want of trying. A perfect 2nd Earth could have possibilities for ET but what are the chances of life even beginning. We came about mostly by luck.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #7 | 12/01 2015 06:27
Good question. It is wise to invest in studying when applications of what we study can be used (new treatments for diseases, new methods of constructing, improving computer systems to run faster and/or have more storage space, ...) We were able to land on the moon in the 1960s given how close the moon is to the Earth. I know that, sometime in 2011, Juno was sent out towards Jupiter. The purpose may be available on one website.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #8 | 09/01 2015 10:33
well ,, we're doing this with a hope that THEY will reach us
Positive: 10 %
Answer #9 | 09/01 2015 05:12
so we can map out what we know, and then use that info to guide us on missions that we can reach.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #10 | 08/01 2015 23:35
There is no point. Even the information about them is "inferred" from Astrometry. There is no way one can image one of them, in any of the telescopes. Let's see what the 30 m aperture telescope in Hawaii is going to do.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #11 | 08/01 2015 12:58
But when we DO develop the ability to reach them We will know where to GO. (We advance in knowledge and technology as time goes by, you know)
Positive: 10 %
Answer #12 | 08/01 2015 08:59
We might not be able to reach them in our lifetime, but we could send missiles now to blow them up in the future.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #13 | 07/01 2015 23:55
Exoplanets might not be out of reach forever.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #14 | 07/01 2015 23:15
The greatest question in human history may well be, "Are we alone in the Universe?" Finding the answer is one the greatest endeavors in the history of science. The Ancient Greeks were among those who speculated about other Earth-like worlds and other intelligent beings in the Universe. Now we have the means to hone in on the answer, as telescopes become more powerful and detection techniques more advanced. At present, interstellar space travel is in the realm of science-fiction but many hope to see the day when it is possible.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #15 | 07/01 2015 23:04
The search for knowledge is guiding us, my friend.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #16 | 07/01 2015 13:51
The pursuit of knowledge is it's own "point". Of course the same thing could have been asked of Christopher Columbus.... And many idiots of the time did.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #17 | 07/01 2015 13:35
the same reason i like to read about new luxury cars, even though they are financially out of reach.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #18 | 07/01 2015 16:25
Our curiosity. It is what drives our scientific minds on. We are getting better and better at detection techniques and are able to calculate their density and mass from their orbits. We are not far from detecting their chemistry. Even though they may be impossible to get to with our present technology, we are mere beginners in cosmological history. We may never know, but it sure not for the want of trying. A perfect 2nd Earth could have possibilities for ET but what are the chances of life even beginning. We came about mostly by luck.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #19 | 07/01 2015 14:02
It's the same reason that compelled you to ask that question - curiosity.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #20 | 07/01 2015 13:51
Mankind has a vast curiosity for discovering new things. Even when they are of no possible use. The funny thing is that they often turn out to be useful at some later time.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #21 | 11/01 2015 22:27
Good question. It is wise to invest in studying when applications of what we study can be used (new treatments for diseases, new methods of constructing, improving computer systems to run faster and/or have more storage space, ...) We were able to land on the moon in the 1960s given how close the moon is to the Earth. I know that, sometime in 2011, Juno was sent out towards Jupiter. The purpose may be available on one website.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #22 | 09/01 2015 02:33
well ,, we're doing this with a hope that THEY will reach us
Positive: 10 %
Answer #23 | 08/01 2015 21:12
so we can map out what we know, and then use that info to guide us on missions that we can reach.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #24 | 08/01 2015 15:35
There is no point. Even the information about them is "inferred" from Astrometry. There is no way one can image one of them, in any of the telescopes. Let's see what the 30 m aperture telescope in Hawaii is going to do.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #25 | 08/01 2015 04:58
But when we DO develop the ability to reach them We will know where to GO. (We advance in knowledge and technology as time goes by, you know)
Positive: 10 %
Answer #26 | 08/01 2015 00:59
We might not be able to reach them in our lifetime, but we could send missiles now to blow them up in the future.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #27 | 07/01 2015 15:55
Exoplanets might not be out of reach forever.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #28 | 07/01 2015 15:15
The greatest question in human history may well be, "Are we alone in the Universe?" Finding the answer is one the greatest endeavors in the history of science. The Ancient Greeks were among those who speculated about other Earth-like worlds and other intelligent beings in the Universe. Now we have the means to hone in on the answer, as telescopes become more powerful and detection techniques more advanced. At present, interstellar space travel is in the realm of science-fiction but many hope to see the day when it is possible.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #29 | 07/01 2015 15:04
The search for knowledge is guiding us, my friend.
Positive: 10 %
Answer #30 | 07/01 2015 14:15
What was the purpose of inventing the wheel before we had sports cars?
Positive: 10 %

Possible answer

... at finding planets ... way that allows them to transit their stars from our point ... planets are likely common. But we cant say for ...
Read more
Positive: 42 %
Are Mars missions worth the money? ... The amount of money and time invested in finding new and ... As people start to live on other planets, we will ...
Read more
Positive: 37 %
... of dimming that we identify as transiting planets but are ... distinguish them from their stars. Planets that ... near it to reach ...
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Positive: 23 %
Do you think life exists outside our solar system? ... we just havent dialed the right number to reach them ... We cant even SEE other planets yet to make ...
Read more
Positive: 10 %

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